Newspaper Archive of
Benson High News
Omaha, Nebraska
May 29, 1942     Benson High News
PAGE 2     (2 of 4 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
 
PAGE 2     (2 of 4 available)        PREVIOUS     NEXT      Full Size Image
May 29, 1942
 

Newspaper Archive of Benson High News produced by SmallTownPapers, Inc.
Website © 2022. All content copyrighted. Copyright Information.     Terms Of Use.     Request Content Removal.




Page2 BENSON HIGH NEWS take it hom us This is addressed to the present juniors and sopllomores and freshmen. \\;Vt" seniors, after si,en(ling four years try- ins different systems of getting along at ]euson, are ilOVC i)assin4 4)11 to you those which we have found get the best results. First, do not try to cram too many sub- jects into one semester&apos;s work. Even if you re- main the teachers' pride and joy because you get all l's with 5J_ credits, your outside ac- tivities will suffer. Don't aim for grades alone in planning your program. Take a few things that are good for you, too. Even if you aren't the athletic type, take a year of gym. Don't be afraid you'll look silly" and clumsy to your more athletic friends. There are many more ordinary" people like you in the gym classes than there are star athletes. Ten years from now you won't remember whether you got a 2 or a 3 in speech class, but you will be glad that you learned to enunciate clearly and to make your voice carry. One thing that will help you in your career at Benson is observance of the rules of the school. It won't make you any more popular to whistle in the halls, or chew gum, or mark the library books and magazines. Get your assignments in on time if you want the teachers to love w)u. When you know you have to have three book reports in by the end of the semester, don't leave them all until the last week. When you have a two-day as- signment, don't let it go until the last period of the second day,. Be careful of ahsences. Too many, absences are hard on the grades. Be sure you have a good reason before you stay" out of school. Of course, if you have a bad cold, you don't want to infect others, but if it was just because you were out too late the night before, you had better change 3-our habits. Be on time. Don't stand in the hall talking quite so long and you can make it. If your schedule is not extra-heavy and yet you find you have a hard time getting your as- signments clone, you had better check on your study habits. Have you been gossiping and wasting your time in study halls? Have you been fooling around at home until late in the evening and then having to work until mid- night to get your assignments clone ? Have you been going out so many nights that your school- work slides ? Turn over a new leaf next semester. These suggestions really work; they aren't just preaching. The rest of your school career will be easier and pleasanter if you take this advice. If Tangerine is all they claim, I wonder if we could or-ange a date with her. We heard about the boy who forgot to lead the seniors in the processional. I guess he didn't know what commence-ment. health means victory Editor's note: This editorial was written by a eomminee from Miss P, ertie Hoag's social problems class which is sponsor- ing the Victory Through Health campaign this week in Benson High. Today we are living in a world of havoc and destruction. Our normal easy-flowing course of life is disrupted. In such a time the health of the nation suffers, yet good health is the first requisite for victory. It is the duty, of each one of us to protect himself against disease and poor physical condition, because the things we can do at home are very important to those on the front lines. Regular hours, good food, and plenty of exercise are needed to keel-} yourself in the best condition. When we are in school these conditions are taken for granted by most of us. But summer is very near, and many of you will be so anxious to have a good time that you will be careless about your hours of sleep; you will eat irregular meals, and often your selection of food will not be the wisest. This certainly isn't the way to make or to keep your country healthy. During the summer months try to kee I ) yourself--and your nation--in tip-top condition by following more closely, the rules of heahh. Make ever 3, week health week. A nation's strength is in the health of its people. You have heard all the little moron jokes, but did you hear about the Eskimo who froze because he needed more-on. Can anyone remember when the oulv con- flict of a double (late was which car to use? Farewell Fellow Jive Cats Dig, dig. dig, you lovers of lovely lyrics: you sup- porters of swing : yon benefactors of boogie-woogie ; yes, even you comrade> of corn! Here I anl again. O1' juke Duke Ellington has come out with a mellow well-o this month. It's called "Moon Mist," and Johnny Hodges' alto is super. A tricky tune that is catching on quick is "Me and My Melinda." Jimmy Dorsey's crew have done a smooth job of it with some fine, nmted trumpet stuff. Real, rock-bottom sending is \\;Voody Herman's plat- ter of, "Blue Ink." Cy White pulls an "Ahino Rey" on the guitar and gets by with it. For those who like their songs solid, this is it. Teddy Powell, whose outfit is getting better by the beat, does a dreamy disc on "All Those Wonderful Years." Peggy Mann rocks the lyrics to sleep. Raymond Scott, who writes most of his own music (and can't you tell by the titles!), rolls right on the beam with "Dinner Music For a Pack of Hungry Cats." It's red hot, low-down, jammin' jive with some pretty paradiddle drumming sprinkled in. \\;Veil, this is the last time you will read my jive jargon and platter prattle for quite a spell; but before I sign off I'd like to stuff the ballot box in voting "Chattanooga Choo-Choo" and "Blues In the Night" the best songs of the past season. How about it? But, as all good things must come to an end, so must all bad things, so I'm saying fare thee well, my fellow hepcats, and during the sweltering summer months when I'm beatin' it out on the side of a bat- tered juke box, as Kay Kyser would drawl, "I'11 be thinkin' of you." JEROME STONE '4a Teacher's Pest There are students who are silIy, There are students who are stern, But the ones that are mcst irksome, Are the ones that never learn. They're the ones who whistle, And chew gum in study hall, But the guy who whams you on the back ls the biggest pest of all. Tile gals aren't perfect either, They often walk in fours, And are practically impassable In all the classroom doors. And the freshman with the rubber-band And rolled-up tin-foil lead, \\;Vaits till the teacher's back is tnrned, Then fires at your head. But I guess school isn't school \\;Vithout a pest or two, \\;Vhy now that I come to think of it, I fit this description, don't you? Abbreviated Bunnies Patti Shaffer--afterthought Betty Berry--gun Shirley Hilhner--quiet Phyllis Garrison--soap Philip Matza--afternoon Alene Meschede--morning Lorine Beam--pound Rnth Reiter--railroad Dorothy Rasmussen--doctor Patricia Kelly--gum m. Store hours 9:30 A. M. to 5:30 P. M. Skip It Skip day, the holiday- belonging exclusiw'ly to senior% came to Bel>on High school May 10. After a breakfast at Ehnwo.d [,ark, the seniors separated and spent the day in xarious ways. \\;Vbat did you do on skip day ? Betty Haas: "[ ate 2 candy bars, 1 hox of licorice, 1 sack of carmel corn, 1 hamhurger (large), 1 ch}wn sundae, and 1 limeade, during which, before, and after I saw 2 shows." Lois E. Harmon : "I walked and walked and walked." Bob tonrad: "\\;Ve went to Lincoln and saw the tov'n on foot--tate capitol, inu>eunl, staditnn North- east High school, Lincoln Central High school, two dime stores, city hall, and Goht and Co." Shirley Bnrri: "I rode a tandem bicycle, went horse back riding, ate footlongs, went boating and fishing, and learned to manipulate a motor hoot, all in one day." Jack Gurnett: ".\\;rthur Rodgers and I cleaned up Elmwood park after the breakfast." Echo of An Election Pot script to senior "Mosts and Best" election: Best Actor--Jack Feierman Best Artist Elaine Hohnan Best Athlete--George Surber Best Musician--John Hornbergcr Best Mannered--Byron Erixon Best Natured Boy--Oscar Cooke Best Caveman--Mal Watkins Biggest Bluffer--John Eldredge Best Dressed Boy--Don Swanson Sweetest Girl--Mary Powers Best Girl Musician--loyce Ralph Best Dressed Girl Nancy Nagl Lest We Forget 'Tis a comfortln' thought that school is alnlost over, but the seniors, though departing, will hold (lear many familiar signs of B.H.S. For instance: The drippy right water faucet at the front of the cafeteria. The venetian blinds in the office. Mr. Krebs' prep tests. The hall after the first bell has rung. The annual electrical demonstration of ('. E. Jones. English I, II, llI, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII ! The endless homestyle line. The stuffed pelican in Room 120. The worn little row of chairs in the office. Putrid reminders that we have chemistry classes. And last, but not lea<t, the final day of school --getting out for summer vacation [ Benchley Relates Zoo Tale How would you feel if, upon applying for a cixil service job, you were made superintendent of a zoo? VVeI1, such is Mrs. Belle Benchley's story in "My Life in a Man Made Jnngle." Like a safari through the jungles of Africa this book takes you through a tremendous number of ex- periences with animals. From tile lowly sqnirrels to the rare animals, the koala, the gorillas, and kopoki, she gives a keen word description of her encounters, ex- periences, and interesting facts and information about most of "her friends at tile San Diego zoo." She also tells how she helped build the zoo up till it was truly a "man made jungle" and ranked with the top zoos of the country. New kinds of cages, grottos where the large animals could be happy in near natural surroundings, and a great flying cage, large as a city block to house the eagles, hawks, and vultures, all helped make it a place where the animals could be happy while on display. BILL ROOKE '42. Tel. AT. 7334 1505-15 Douglas Street s GIRLS' Rain O' Shine " 2 / COATS OF GENUINE U. S. ARMY TWILL Coats that defy the weather man by suiting ID with equal efficiency sunshine and rain. It has a D  boyish look that girls love over sport dresses of slacks -- with raglan sleeves, two large patch pockets, zipper front, and small coin pocket. Light khaki Only Sizes 8 to 16. Kilpatrick's Girl's Section--Second Floor SENIORS Insure yourself of a good position after graduation. Attend the Commercial Extension School of Commerce 16th and Howard Lack Of Transportation Facilities will make it necessary to increase the prices of coal and coke next |all. Buy Yours Now At The O'Neil Lumber And Grain Co. IRVINGTON ./A. 4260 We Buy and Sell Grain. Letter Perfect 118 No. Lincoln Ave:. \\;Vashington, D. C. May 29, 1952 Dear Ruth, I arrived in Washington two days ago and am ins a wonderful time on my vacation trip. Remember ten vears ago when we were seniors at genson? I've'lost track of a lot of nay classmates, but today I nlct three of thent again. These three girls were really brilliant and popular too. They were all placed on the National Honor society and Quill and Scroll. You re- member them, don't you? "Weasie," "Janey," and Laurel. This morning I went to see a friend in the hos- pital. \\;Vell, as I was passing the operating room, out came a cute nurse vlloin I recognized as Eloise Seaton. She told me she had been in surgery for about two years. In Benson she was sort of a "Jill-of-all-trades," heing ice president of the Camera club, chairman of the make-up committee, associate editor of the Cupola, and news editor and proofreader of the Benson High News, not to mention her membership in various other school clubs. Photography and bird study were tbe most important of her long list of hobbies. I remember two of her pet peeves were a boy who comes early for a date and clocks that stop. Coming back to the pre- sent, I left Eloise at her work and went on to see the rest of Washington. Sauntering down the street, I wandered into the consulate buihling and ran into Jane McElhaney. I re- cognized her right away. She was editor-in-chief and advertising manager of the Benson High News and won the Quill and Scroll medallion for creative writing. She was on the honor roll every semester and was a. member of many cluhs. She spent a lot of time read- ing, liked to drive a ear, play tennis, and swim. She's certainly gone a long way heing in Washington as a Spanish translator for tile government. Well, since a trip to \\;Vashiugton just isn't a trip unless you see the capitol building, I decided to go there. Just as I was going up the long flight of stair to the building, I met Laurel Fuller. She was news editor of the Benson High News, assistant editor of the student handbook, and co-director of ProductloR Staff. She came to Omaha from Ames, Iowa, and said it's the "most horrible feeling to walk into a school~ room when you're new." Now Laurel is the private secretary of Otto Buildemwell, who goes about the country supervising the President's projects. Becoming a secretary and traveling around the country meeting lots of people were her greatest ambitions, and she certainly got her wish. So long, Ruthie, Your pal, Bey. ; Styles In Swing When it's Springtime in old Benson, it's time to sing and swing, so get on the down beat and look at the "Zoot suits" swinging round tbe Benson balls. Eleanor Petrich's striped cotton suit, (which she made herself), and Jo Anne Bennett's light brown suit are at- tractive assets to Benson's balls. Betty Ocander's white pleated skirt and reddish-brown jacket also "takes- your breath away! .... The Beautiful Lady in Blue," might be Virginia Chadwell in her smart blue dress trimmed in very crisp white pique. "Hurrah for the Red, White, and Blue" and red-headed Jacqueline Young stands up in her attractive, flower-printed navy blue and white cotton. "Oh the Lady in Red" is- Betty'Lou Traynor swishing down the hall in a heart- warming shade. "Dark Eyes" has Betty Latta, which reflect her fresh brown and white polka dot dress of crisp waffle pique. After seeing Pat Hasselquist's new formal, all the Benson senoritas sigh "Tangerine." Well, gals, "Good Bye Now," the clothes line wilI be full of gay, exciting new styles when " 'Tis Autumn." Benson High News All-American Honor Rating, National Scholastic Press Association, 1938-39, 1941-42 International Honor Rating, Quill and Scroll, 1937-41 Published Bi-Weekly by Journalism Classes Benson High School, Omaha, Nebraska Managing Editor ........................................................ Paul Patterson Editor-in-Chief .................................................... Jan MeElhaney J Charlotte Smith Associate Editors ..................................................  Bob Kroeger News Editor ............................................................... Laurel Fuller Sports Editor ........................................................... Dick Puetz Phyllis Johnson Patrlcia Berigan Copyreaders ........................................................... Carl Berglund Lois Beebe Head Prootreader ....................................................... Birgit Snderberg Assistant Proofreaders f Beverly Hyde ..........................................  Jeanne LeNoir Staff Cartoonist ........................................................ Tom Sheehan REPORTERS Virginia Baumer Lucite Lindborg Bill Poe Ralph Bradley Catherine Maxwell Jean Reynolds Harry Farnham Marjorie Meyer Bill Rooke Marian Grant Kethryn Mullen Howard Selling Betty Lou Hess Carletta Okerberg Gloria Shufelt Edith Holmes Johnny Ostronie Lois Spellman Paula Lee Jones Bernice Peck Eleanor Stainman Patrieia Landis Virginia Van Perry Jerome Stone Kenneth Larsen Mary Lou Wilson Business Manager ................................................. Virginia Chadwell Assistant Business Manager ..................................... Lois Beebe Advertising Manager .......................................... Betty Rhodes Assistant Advertising Manager .......................... Lueille Sapienza Circulation Manager ................................................ Jim Kratt Exchange Editor ........................ : ............................ Fritz Ruzicka Assistant Exchange Editor ...................................... Bob Fust Adviser ............................................................................. Gunnar Horn Mary MeNamara, Principal ot Benson High School Entered as seeond class matter, Oct. 2, 1929, at the Post Office at Omaha, Nebr., under the act of March 3, 1879. Subscription Price, Per Year ............................................................ $1.00